Marino Marini’s Poster for an Exhibition (1959)

Marino Marini had a particular penchant for including his initial M in his numerous prints of horses. EPPH has already shown how in this poster he designed for an exhibition the horse only has 3 legs thus forming an M.1 That, though, is not all. 

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Captions for image(s) above:

Marini, Untitled, Poster for an Exhibition (1959) Tempera and ink on paper. 49 x 34.5cm. Private Collection.

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The big blue circle resembling an ocular window has a pupil and eyelid in the center of it which hopefully is clearer in the diagram (top right). That means together with the circles on the other side of the horse (bottom) there are a set of eyes in the building. The one on the left with the pupil probably represents exterior vision with the brighter, more celestial-like eye on the right for insight. You will find dozens more examples under Insight-Outsight.

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Captions for image(s) above:

Top L & R: Detail of Marini's Poster with a diagram of the detail
Bottom: Larger detail of Marini's Poster

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Marini like many of his contemporaries took advantage of the modern style to hide other meanings. Viewers, assuming anything was now possible in art, would not question a horse with three legs. Nor that the horse's head is anthropomorpic and, on further investigation, resembles Marini himself. At least, the eye, straight nose with large mouth and chin conveys Marino's expression. That's why it's so important to question all details in an image, even those that look "natural".

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Captions for image(s) above:

L: Detail of Marini's Poster
R: inset: Photograph of Marini, detai

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For instance, it's likely that the chest and barrel of this horse form a female breast with a ringed nipple. You can see it outlined in the diagram. This would be difficult to confirm as a breast if it were not for its perfect placement under the head of the horse-as-Marino. A female breast in the work of a male artist is a common sign of mental fertility as well as androgyny (which an artist's mind must theoretically be if the art is to be universal).

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Captions for image(s) above:

Detail and diagram of Marini's Poster

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There is more to explain here like the criss-cross pattern behind the horse's legs, the whitewash over the rectangles, the vertical lines in the upper right corner and even the double Xs at top left. They are unlikely as mere decoration. However, the amount so far uncovered is more than has ever been seen. I leave the rest up to you. It might be good practice.














 

Captions for image(s) above:

Marini, Untitled, Poster for an Exhibition (1959) 

Click image to enlarge.

Notes:

1. See the EPPH entry Marino Marini's M's (1951-1978).

Original Publication Date on EPPH: 14 Sep 2015. © Simon Abrahams. Articles on this site are the copyright of Simon Abrahams. To use copyrighted material in print or other media for purposes beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. Websites may link to this page without permission (please do) but may not reproduce the material on their own site without crediting Simon Abrahams and EPPH.